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Louisville Water Co. President Jim Brammell Stepping Down

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Kristina Goetz
/
Louisville Water Company

Amid a series of controversies, the Louisville Water Company announced Wednesday that its president, Jim Brammell, will retire at the end of the year.

Brammell has worked for the city-owned Louisville Water Company since 1995. In 2013, he was elevated from vice president and chief engineer to president and chief executive. He replaced Greg Heitzman, who left the company to take over the beleaguered Metropolitan Sewer District.

The water company has been under fire for the rollout of a new billing system. Criticism has included over-billing and long waits on the customer service telephone line, The Courier-Journal recently reported. Brammell and another executive were also recently accused of using personal text messages and other electronic messaging to conduct company business, in violation of state open records laws, WDRB reported.

Also, Brammell pleaded guilty last month to driving under the influence of alcohol in Oldham County.

In a news release, the water company said Brammell had played a significant role in efforts to bring the company's drinking water supply to areas surrounding the city. The company also noted that it exceeded its dividend expectation to Louisville Metro.

The Board of Water Works will discuss a transition plan on Nov. 17, said board chair Creighton Mershon in the news release.

Brammell's annual salary is $249,731, according to the Business First salary database.

He's the second head of a Louisville water utility to retire this year. In April, Heitzman also announced that he'd retire from MSD.

In recent years, the Louisville Water Company and MSD had explored ways to collaborate and consolidate their efforts in an initiative dubbed One Water. The two entities announced steps toward collaboration in February 2014.

Brammell could not immediately be reached for comment Wednesday.