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Doctors Don't Always Disclose Alzheimer's Diagnosis to Patients, Report Says

Fewer than half of people with Alzheimer's disease were told their diagnosis by their physician, according to a report released Tuesday.

The 2015 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figuresreport, released by the Alzheimer's Association, found that only 45 percent of people ages 65 and older with Alzheimer's were told the diagnosis by their doctor.

Elizabeth Betts, special events manager for the Greater Kentucky and Southern Indiana chapter, said the figures are alarming.

"All people living with Alzheimer's disease deserve the opportunity to know the truth about their diagnosis because this allows them to maximize the quality of their life and to play an active role with their families in planning for their futures," she said.

Alzheimer's disease is the sixth leading cause of death in Kentucky. In 2012, 1,462 Kentuckians died from the disease. There has also been a 72 percent increase in Alzheimer's deaths in the state since 2000.

In Indiana, 2,104 people have died from Alzheimer's. The state has also experienced a 74 percent increase in Alzheimer's deaths since 2000.

The association said disclosing an Alzheimer's diagnosis has benefits, including an opportunity for a second opinion and better medical care.

"Waiting until later in the course of the disease, because it is a progressive  brain disease, this has the potential to deprive the person to seek the care and treatment early in the disease," Betts said.