© 2024 Louisville Public Media

Public Files:
89.3 WFPL · 90.5 WUOL-FM · 91.9 WFPK

For assistance accessing our public files, please contact info@lpm.org or call 502-814-6500
89.3 WFPL News | 90.5 WUOL Classical 91.9 WFPK Music | KyCIR Investigations
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations
Stream: News Music Classical

Indiana Statehouse Update: AI revenge porn, prior authorization reform, child labor laws

The Indiana Statehouse is reflected in the windows of a building.
Justin Hicks
/
IPB News
The 2024 Indiana legislative session will run through no later than March 14, 2024.

An artificial intelligence revenge pornography bill clears the House. A Senate committee advances prior authorization reform. And a House committee rolls back some child labor protections.

Here’s what you might have missed this week at the Indiana Statehouse.

HB 1047: Sexual offenses

A House-approved bill, HB 1047, makes it a crime to share intimate images or videos of someone that were computer-generated without the person’s consent. The measure is an extension of the state’s “revenge porn” law.

SB 3: Prior authorization

Legislation approved by a Senate committee, SB 3, bans prior authorization for routine and emergency services, and common prescription drugs. Prior authorization is pre-approval that insurance companies require before they’ll pay for a medical service. The bill also puts limits on both the amount of prior authorizations insurers can require, and the time it takes to approve services.

READ MORE: How do I follow Indiana’s legislative session? Here’s your guide to demystify the process

Join the conversation and sign up for the Indiana Two-Way. Text "Indiana" to 765-275-1120. Your comments and questions in response to our weekly text help us find the answers you need on statewide issues, including our project Civically, Indiana and our 2024 legislative bill tracker.

HB 1093: Employment of minors

A measure approved by a House committee, HB 1093, scales back some child labor exemptions on hour and time restrictions for 14 to 18-year-olds throughout the state. Proponents say it would help Indiana rules mirror federal regulations, while providing child workers more opportunities. Opponents worry about children’s safety.

Find all the bills our statewide team is covering in our bill tracker at ipbs.org/2024billtracker/.

Brandon is our Statehouse bureau chief. Contact him at bsmith@ipbs.org or follow him on Twitter at @brandonjsmith5.
Copyright 2024 IPB News.

Tags
Brandon Smith